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Conteo Reinita Cerúlea (Cerulean Warbler Count) 2013

Cerulean Warbler Conservation-CR

Introduction
The Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) is a species that breeds in the eastern part of North America between May and July. After the breeding season, they migrate to South America to spend the winter months. Unfortunately, the populations of this species have declined 70% since the 1960’s.  Currently, this species is listed by IUCN as "vulnerable to extinction."  The most influential factor in the decline of their populations is the destruction of its habitat throughout its distribution.
As a species on the verge of extinction, many organizations have focused on studying it thoroughly, especially at both ends of its range, where they breed and where they spend the winter. This has created a big question: What routes are used by Cerulean Warblers to migrate, feed and rest, on their way to and from their breeding grounds?  Although its range at both ends is being studied, we do not know much about their migratory routes.
This is why Cerulean Warbler Conservation-Costa Rica (CWC-CR) has been studying this species since 2005, trying to discover what importance Costa Rica has in their migratory route, as well as  studying their natural history.

Why support our organization?
Cerulean Warbler Conservation-Costa Rica is the only organization designed to study the Cerulean Warbler as they migrate to South America, as a way to achieve important steps to protect their migration routes and stop-over sites, and understand more about their ecology during migration.  The importance of this organization not only lies in preventing the extinction of the Cerulean Warbler, but also protects a wide range of species that coexist in the habitat of the Cerulean Warbler. Cerulean Warbler Conservation is part of an international initiative to protect the continental avifauna.

Who we are
In August 2005, the founding members of Cerulean Warbler Conservation-Costa Rica discovered large numbers of this species in certain parts of the Caribbean foothills of Costa Rica. This discovery was the trigger for initiating a program of conservation, research and education concerning the Cerulean Warbler.
The group was created with the purpose of studying the Cerulean Warbler for data and evidence to demonstrate the importance of Costa Rica and Central America for migration and survival of this species, and therefor generate initiatives for its protection.  At the same time we are educating the general public to preserve the Cerulean Warbler and steer it away from extinction.

Our Mission
Our mission is to influence, encourage and assist societies throughout Central America, especially Costa Rica, to preserve the integrity and diversity of ecosystems used by the Cerulean Warbler and other migratory species, as a strategic way to preserve other species that coexist in its ecosystem. Thus, achieving a comprehensive awareness of local people to maintain a balance between ecosystem conservation and sustainable development through sustainable productive alternatives.

CERULEAN WARBLER WATCH
Starting in 2009, the Research Group of Cerulean Warbler Conservation, has organized country-wide counts for Cerulean Warblers (Setophaga cerulea) and other endangered migratory bird species in Costa Rica, with great success.
The intention of the organizers of this count is to involve citizen scientists directly in the conservation project of the Cerulean Warbler to raise awareness about how endangered this species is, and at the same time collect data to help us create a conservation plan for this and many other species of migratory birds. A count of such magnitude can give us important information about migratory routes used by the Cerulean Warbler, which remains a mystery.

For those who have never seen this spectacular warbler it is a great opportunity to see one, and for those who have already seen it, you will have chances to bird areas with the richest bird diversity in Central America!
If you wish to participate in a Cerulean Warbler Watch, write an email to: cerulea.org@gmail.com
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